Photo Essay: An Afternoon at Medellin’s Botanical Garden

by Ekua on November 26, 2013 in captured on memory card,Colombia

As I walk into the Jardin Botanico de Medellin, it feels less like a botanical garden and more like a lively public park. Some people are checking out the plants, but mostly it feels like a place where people come to have a picnic and enjoy the company of good friends or a good book on a lovely day like this one. I like the casual, communal feel of the botanical garden and how even though it’s busy, you can still find quiet spaces:

Botanical Garden in Medellin, Colombia

The Orchideorama at the Botanical Garden in Medellin, Colombia

Orchids at the Botanical Garden in Medellin, Colombia

Botanical Garden in Medellin, Colombia

Botanical Garden in Medellin, Colombia

Botanical Garden in Medellin, Colombia

Botanical Garden in Medellin, Colombia

Botanical Garden in Medellin, Colombia

Botanical Garden in Medellin, Colombia

Botanical Garden in Medellin, Colombia

Botanical Garden in Medellin, Colombia

Botanical Garden in Medellin, Colombia

The 40-acre Jardin Botanico de Medellin is admission-free and easy to access via the Universidad metro station. Be sure to check out the Orchideorama, the uniquely designed space that houses the garden’s orchids and reflects Medellin’s innovative world of public art and architecture. Also look out for vertical gardens, a cactus garden, and a few small animals. On the less-visited outskirts of the park, you can find a walkway lined with historic newspaper articles and a recreation of a traditional Colombian Amazon house.

Jardin Botanico de Medellin
Calle 73 No. 51D-14
botanicomedellin.org

{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

Fly Girl December 1, 2013 at 11:39 am

I love botanical gardens, they are always serene. Why do they write their names on the cacti leaves?

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Ekua December 1, 2013 at 3:46 pm

Botanical gardens are great and I thought this one was pretty cool because it was such a hangout spot in addition to the plants. I didn’t see any other travelers there and it felt like a good place to begin to get a sense of Medellin.

The names in the cacti is just graffiti, the same way people carve their names into trees for whatever reason. Maybe someone did it once and others followed. They actually have signs in the cacti garden that show a man with a bare back with names carved into it. The message is basically: How would you feel if someone did this to you? I’m not sure if people ignore those signs or if the names are from before the sign when up.

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Joanne Joseph December 5, 2013 at 1:15 am

I too noticed the writing etched into the cactus. Your pictures are lovely and make me want to take an afternoon stroll.

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Ekua December 5, 2013 at 5:28 pm

Thanks 🙂

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